Our Family Genealogy Pages

Home Page  |  What's New  |  Photos  |  Histories  |  Headstones  |  Reports  |  Surnames
Search
First Name:


Last Name:



George Benjamin CRANER

Male 1799 - 1854  (54 years)


Personal Information    |    Media    |    Notes    |    Event Map    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name George Benjamin CRANER 
    Born 3 Jun 1799  Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Christened 13 Jun 1799  Holy Trinity, Coventry Warwick, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    _COLOR
    _FSFTID KWJY-X2Q 
    _UID 7E26A5246111D511804F444553540000C488 
    Died 18 May 1854  Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Aft 18 May 1854  Plains of Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I474  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 29 Mar 2015 

    Father George CRANER,   b. Abt 1773, Coventry, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Abt 1805  (Age ~ 32 years) 
    Mother Elizabeth ROBINSON,   b. Abt 1777, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 28 Nov 1843  (Age ~ 66 years) 
    Married 25 Dec 1798  Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Sealed to Spouse (LDS) Cleared 
    Family ID F164  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Elizabeth WEST,   b. 1 Mar 1799, Fillongley, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Apr 1869, Tooele, Tooele, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 70 years) 
    Married 8 Feb 1819  Fillongley, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Elizabeth CRANER,   b. 2 Jul 1818, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 26 Jan 1864  (Age 45 years)
     2. Mary CRANER,   b. 1 Apr 1820, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 16 Jan 1846  (Age 25 years)
     3. George Benjamin CRANER, Jr.,   b. 16 Apr 1822, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 Feb 1824  (Age 1 years)
     4. Joseph CRANER,   b. 17 Nov 1824, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Feb 1898  (Age 73 years)
     5. Thomas CRANER,   b. 9 Apr 1826, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Mar 1881  (Age 54 years)
    +6. George CRANER,   b. 1 Jun 1829, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Jul 1904, Tooele, Tooele, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 75 years)
     7. William CRANER,   b. 1 Jul 1832, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 8 May 1838  (Age 5 years)
    +8. Harriett Ann CRANER,   b. 26 Apr 1834, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Sep 1874, Richmond, Cache, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 40 years)
    +9. Abraham Fredrick CRANER,   b. 3 Apr 1836, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 Feb 1902, Oakley, Cassia, Idaho Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 65 years)
    +10. Ann CRANER,   b. 15 Jul 1838, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Apr 1906, Winder Ward Mill, Salt Lake, Utah Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 67 years)
    +11. John CRANER,   b. 8 Jul 1842, Mastake, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 4 Aug 1903, Oakley, Cassia, Idaho Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 61 years)
    +12. Martha CRANER,   b. 16 May 1844, Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 19 Sep 1916, Cleveland, Franklin, Idaho Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 72 years)
    Last Modified 20 Feb 2017 
    Family ID F112  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 3 Jun 1799 - Maxstoke, Warwickshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsChristened - 13 Jun 1799 - Holy Trinity, Coventry Warwick, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 8 Feb 1819 - Fillongley, Warwickshire, England Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 18 May 1854 - Kansas Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsBuried - Aft 18 May 1854 - Plains of Kansas Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Histories
    Voyage of the Ship Windermere
    Voyage of the Ship Windermere
    by Evelyn A. Sessions

  • Notes 
    • For several generations, the Craners lived in the villages of Maxstoke, Fillongley and the town of Coventry, Warwickshire, England. George Benjamin was born in Coventry 3 June 1799. He was the oldest of two children born to George and Elizabeth Robinson Craner. He was christened twice, once in Holy Trinity, Coventry, Warwickshire, England 13 June 1799 and again at St. John's, Coventry, Warwickshire, England, 13 September 1802. His parents had both been born in Coventry as well as his grandparents, William and Elizabeth Moore Craner.

      Elizabeth West, George Benjamin's wife, was born 1 March 1799 in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. She was the daughter of William and Elizabeth Ranger West. She was christened 17 March 1799 in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. She was raised in the village of Fillongley. All of these villages and towns are only three to four miles apart.

      George Benjamin Craner and Elizabeth West were married 8 Feb 1819 in Fillongley, Warwickshire, England. Neither one of them could write their name. George Benjamin worked as a farm laborer. The family was very poor and when the children were old enough, as early as 13, they worked as servants or in the case of the son, Joseph; he was apprenticed as a tailor.

      They were the parents of twelve children:

      Name:Birth Date:Death Date:
      1.Elizabeth Craner 2 Jul 1818 Jan 1864
      2.Mary Craner 1 Apr 182016 Jan 1846
      3.George Benjamin Craner, Jr. 16 Apr 1822 bur 8 Feb 1824
      4.Joseph Craner 17 Nov 18243 Aug 1898
      5.Thomas Craner 9 Apr 1826
      6.George Craner 1 June 182917 July 1904
      7.William Craner 1 Jul 1832 bur 8 May 1838
      8.Harriet Ann Craner 26 Apr 183415 Sep 1874
      9.Abraham Frederick Craner c. 3 Apr 1836 bur 23 Feb 1902
      10.Ann Craner 15 Jul 183825 Apr 1906
      11.John Craner 8 Jul 18424 Aug 1903
      12.Martha Craner 16 May 184419 Sep 1916

      Two of the children, George Benjamin, Jr. (age 2) and William (age 5) died in their youth.

      In 1845, the Craners listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. The gospel must have given the Craners new hope and vision. Elizabeth West Craner was the first to be baptized, 5 June 1845, followed by their son, George, 1 January 1846, then Harriet, 6 Jan 1846. George Benjamin followed on 10 March 1846. Three other children were baptized in England: Ann and Martha 1852, and Abraham Frederick 1856. The Saints were encouraged to come to Zion in America when they were able. So, that became the "Craner Dream".

      In 1851, their son, George (age 21) emigrated to the United States. In the next few years, he established a home and a prosperous farm in Tooele, Tooele, Utah. He sent money back to England for his family to come to America.

      By this time, Elizabeth, Mary, Joseph, and Thomas were all married or out of the household.

      On the 22 February 1854, George Benjamin (age 54) Elizabeth (age 54), Harriet (age 19), Ann (age 15), John (age 11) Martha (age 9) set sail from Liverpool to the United States on the ship Windermere with a total of 477 Latter Day Saints. Joseph and Abraham Frederick planned to immigrate later. Eventually, Frederick emigrated in May 1862, but Joseph, his wife and family stayed in England.

      A detailed description of the voyage is as follows:

      Voyage on the ship Windermere

      "As the vessel started in motion the songs of Zion blending in the soul inspiring harmony, thrilled the souls of the passengers and their many friends standing on the shore gazing at the departed vessel, shouting farewell, goodbye, with eyes streaming with tears; doubtless, recalling that only the night before seven vessels with all aboard went down in the depths of the channel.

      As the land disappeared in the distance the sweet singing ceased and many began to feel sick. About 8 p.m. the first day at sea, an old gentleman, named Squires, died. All that night the wind howled fiercely, the sea was rough, the ship was driven from its course towards the Isle of Aton. About 11 p.m. off Holy Head, which is a most dangerous point, and the scene of frequent ship wrecks, was passed. On the morning of the 23rd, Father Squire, who died the night before was thrown overboard. The sea was still rough and the wind was blowing. During the day the Windermere sailed by the remains of a wrecked vessel. Masts, sails, and other fragments were floating around. Likely, a few hours previous, many departed souls had tenaciously clung to these same objects for relief that never came. All had been consigned to a watery grave, for no signs of life remained and the rolling waves swept over the bodies of the lifeless sleepers, while the wind howled its requiem for the dead.

      Some were now beginning to recover from sea sickness, but many were still ill and some confined to their berths. About this time, birds were seen flying which would rise from the water and fly a short distance and drop into the water again. Life on the Windermere was now growing monotonous; for its accommodations were poor for so many passengers, and then it did not sail like the ocean steamers now do which are propelled by steam. The Windermere was eight weeks, four nights and five days sailing from Liverpool to New Orleans, which now can be made in six or seven days. We were on the Atlantic Ocean about seven weeks without seeing land.

      On the 12th of March from 7 to 8 in the morning an exceedingly fierce storm arose. The wind roared like one of our mountain winds. The masts cracked and the sails were cut to pieces. The Captain of the Windermere expressed fears that the ship couldn't stand so heavy a sea, and in speaking to Daniel Garn, the President of the Saints on board said, "I am afraid the ship can't stand this storm. Mr. Garn, if there be a God, as your people say there is, you had better talk to him if he will hear you. I have done all I can for the ship, and I am afraid with all that can be done, she will go down."

      Elder Garn went to the Elders, who presided over the nine wards in the ship and requested them to get all the Saints on board to fast and call a prayer meeting to be held in each ward at 10 a.m. and pray that we might be delivered from the danger. The waves dashed with white foam. The storm continued in all its fury but precisely at 10 a.m., the prayer meetings were held. The ship rolled from side to side. On one side the Saints were hanging by their hands and on the other they were standing on their heads. Then the ship would roll on the other side which would reverse their positions. About this time the large boxes which were tied with ropes under the berths broke loose and with pots, pans and kettles rolled with terrible force on each side of the vessel.

      Although the prayers were fervent and earnest, as the pleading of poor souls brought face to face with danger and death, they ceased their prayers to watch and dodge the untied boxes and great confusion prevailed for some time. The wind roared like a hurricane. Sail after sail was torn to shreds and lost. The waves were very large and, as far as the eye could see, seemed to be one angry mass of rolling white foam. The hatches were fastened down. This awful storm lasted about 18 hours, and then abated a little, but it was stormy from the 8th of March until the 18th. Observation taken by the quadrant showed that the ship was in the same latitude as it was on the 8th.

      On March 20th, which was two days after this terrible storm, the small pox broke out. One of three sisters was taken down with it. She had a light attack and recovered, but her two sisters then came down with it and both died. After that 37 others-40 in all, came down with it. Three days after the breaking out of the small pox the ship took fire under the cooking gallery. At this time, we had not seen land for three weeks or more. When the cry of "FIRE, the ships on FIRE" rang through the vessel, wild excitement and consternation prevailed everywhere. The sailors plied water freely. All the water buckets on board were brought into use and soon the fire was under control.

      When the last of the three sisters, who took the small pox died, it was evening. W. W. Burton thought he would get a good place from which to see the body thrown overboard. So, he got outside the vessel and seated himself on the ledge extending out from the deck placing each arm around a rope that led to the rigging. His feet were hanging over the ocean and the ship was sailing about ten knots per hour. By this time darkness was fast setting in, but here he sat waiting to get a good view when the corpse would be thrown into the watery grave, where some said sharks were constantly seen following the prey. Brother Burton went to sleep and the funeral passed without him knowing about it. The sound of feet walking on the deck roused him from his slumber. A chill ran through him, his chair almost stood on end when he sensed his condition. Here he had been asleep, his feet handing off the side of the vessel which was rocking to and fro. He wondered how he had escaped falling overboard. It was now totally dark. He climbed into the ship and resolved never to expose himself so again.

      About this time, the stench of the small pox was fearful in every part of the vessel. Emma Brooks was the name of the young lady just thrown over board. Her sister, Fanny, had died the same day, about half past 1:00 o'clock p.m. and was also thrown over board at 2:00 o'clock. The funeral service at sea is the most melancholy and solemn scene perhaps ever witnessed, especially when the sea is calm. A stillness like that often prevailed while an old sailor at intervals would imitate the doleful toiling of the bell of some old church such as heard in some parts of England. Funerals were becoming frequent.

      About this time the Windermere had been about six weeks out from Liverpool and the passengers had never seen land from the time they had entered the Atlantic. The days were now generally mild and the weather very pleasant.

      The sun set in grandeur and the bright pale moon seemed to be straight above our heads. On April 8th a voice called out, "THERE IS LAND!" Excitement prevailed and there was a rush to see land once more. This land was the Isle of Domingo. On the 9th of April we came in sight of the Island of Cuba. On this day at 10:00 a.m. a young man named Dee died of small pox. At the time of his death, the wind had ceased blowing, not a ripple on the water. The sea appeared bright and clear and seemed as a sea of glass. The young man that had died was sewed in a white blanket and at the feet was placed a heavy weight of coal. A plank was then placed with one end resting in the port hole in the side of the ship and the other near the main hatch way. The body was then placed on this plank. Then the doleful tolling of the bell began. Elder McGhee made a brief address, suitable of the occasion and offered a short prayer, after which the body and bedding of the young man were thrown over board. The ship was standing perfectly still and the body could be seen sinking in the water until it appeared no longer than a person's hand. Some thought it was seen sinking for full fifteen minutes, others still longer, some said half an hour.

      The passengers of the Windermere had passed through a terrible storm, the panic created by the ship taking FIRE, their number decreased by the small pox; still another fearful calamity threatened them. The fresh water supply was getting short and the stores of provisions were failing. The passengers were now limited to one hard small sea biscuit of a day's rations.

      The Captain sent some sailors in a small boat to intercept a ship that was passing in hopes of getting more provisions, but they failed. The Windermere now passed the Western points of the Island of Cuba. The passengers had a good view of the light house located on the most western point. The Gulf of Mexico was before them. The Gulf Stream flowed in like a vast river. Just think of this stream 500 miles across it, very deep and constantly flowing.

      On the morning of April 20th, the ship entered the mouth of the Mississippi River. The passengers were more glad to look upon the plantations of orange groves that bordered the banks of the river than the great strong surging waves of the Atlantic which they had left behind them.

      Sometimes the Negroes would call from the shore and bid the emigrants welcome.

      Among the passengers of the Windermere ship were George Benjamin Craner, age 54, his wife Elizabeth West, age 54, and their four children: Harriet, age 20, Ann, age 15, John, age 11, and Martha age 9.

      They arrived at New Orleans the 24th of April 1854. During the voyage, there were six marriages, six births, and ten deaths." (61 days on the water)

      On the morning after arriving at New Orleans, eleven persons suffering with small pox were sent to the Luzenberg Hospital, according to orders from the Health Officers at the port. Elder Long and five others were selected to remain at New Orleans to attend the sick until they were able to go on.

      The rest of the Company continued the journey from New Orleans on the 27th of April on board a steamboat to St. Louis, Missouri-a distance of 1000 miles up the Mississippi River. They then followed the Missouri River to Kansas City.

      At Kansas City, George Benjamin Craner died on the 18th of May 1854* (age 54) from an attack of cholera. He was buried "on the plains of Kansas" in a grave with two others, a young lady and a child, who had died of the same disease. Elizabeth and the four children continued the journey to Salt Lake City, Utah in the Fifth Company 1854.

      Daniel Garn was selected to be Captain of the Fifth Company. He had been Captain of the Saints while on the ship Windermere. Captain Daniel Garn was released from presiding over the German Mission. And so accompanying him from Germany to Salt Lake City were a small company of Saints from the German Mission. They had traveled together across the Atlantic and continued together across the plains.

      After arriving with his company in Westport (Kansas City) President Garn was appointed to take charge of a company of P.E. Fund Emigrants. To whom were added the German Saints referred to above. Captain Garn was assisted by Elder William F. Carter, who was returning from a Mission to Hindostau.

      The Fifth Company 1854 with Captain Daniel Garn and his company, with about 40 wagons, left Westport (Kansas City) July 2nd and on August 14th was reported to have arrived near Ash Hallow. On 22nd of September they were near Fort Bridger.

      President Brigham Young sent a group of Saints from Salt Lake City to meet this company of Saints crossing the plains, and take to them fresh teams and provisions, and assist them to the Valley. Among this group of Assisters was Alexander Harris. He was born in Tennessee. He had accepted the Gospel there and had crossed the plains earlier. He met Harriet Craner, age 20 and fell in love with her and married her later, 6th of June 1855 in Salt Lake City, Utah. This company finally arrived in Salt Lake City, Utah 1st of October 1854 and camped on Union Square.

      Elizabeth West Craner and her four children continued on to Tooele, Tooele, Utah where her son, George, had a home and farm to welcome them. What a welcome this must have been! After many years of preparations and finally to be here in Zion! One can only imagine the sorrow it must have been for Elizabeth in losing her husband and having to convey this news to her son, George. Elizabeth's strong faith and love of the Savior must have buoyed her up many times. The sacrifice that this family made in joining the church and the desire to be obedient in obeying the prophet's commandment in coming to Zion shows much courage and faith.

      Elizabeth continued to live with her son, George and his family, in Tooele, Tooele, Utah until her death 8 April 1869. She was 70 years old. She is buried in the Tooele Cemetery.