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Ruth COGGESHALL

Female 1753 - Yes, date unknown


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  • Name Ruth COGGESHALL 
    Born 29 Apr 1753  Newport, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Female 
    _AMTID 110112981653:1030:113090087 
    _UID 4E77138B2B1F4C8FB0DC7D424D5CB4B9E96F 
    Died Yes, date unknown 
    Person ID I53186  My Genealogy
    Last Modified 10 Mar 2012 

    Father James COGGESHALL,   b. 5 Feb 1712, Newport, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 Oct 1789, East Greenwich, Kent, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 77 years) 
    Mother Hannah BROOKS,   b. Jun 1721, Newport, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Dec 1780, Newport, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age ~ 59 years) 
    Married 25 Nov 1736  Newport, Newport, Rhode Island Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F21641  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family GREENE,   b. Abt 1750,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Married 29 Nov 1783 
    Last Modified 26 May 2021 
    Family ID F21773  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 29 Apr 1753 - Newport, Newport, Rhode Island Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • The father of Ruth Coggeshall Greene, was a Quaker and as it was against his religious belief, did not take part in the Revolutionary War. He remained at home during that time, and while the British were in possession of Newport he was forced to have a certain number of the Officers quartered with him. At this time Ruth was about twenty-four years of age. One day, one of the younger officers attempted to be free with her, and he tipped her chair; she warned him to beware; he then proposed a kiss; this was too much for the Quaker maiden; she seized a large pair of tongs, and hitting him over the head, felled him to the floor, and for three days he was not to be seen. After this she was an honored maiden; and dubbed 'The Little Rebel General.' Ever after this the greatest respect was shown her. Her father's grounds alone escaped the hands of the destroyer, his orchard being the only one left to bear fruit at the close of the war. She was a woman of exemplary character, and was noted for her cheerful temperament, courageous bearing, and above all for her purity of character. At the time the British were bombarding Newport she took her station at the scuttle window and watched the cannon balls while they fell in every direction, some passing over the house.